Different Flowers You Can Grow In Your Garden

From plants that require a great deal of attention to flowers that require minimum maintenance, there are a number of styles, shades and types of flowers to choose from – which you opt for will usually depend on both your lifestyle and the space you have to work with.

Good soil, some great fertilizer and a little love and care will ensure your garden looks bright and beautiful all summer long.

Marigold

The bright yellow blooms of the many kinds of marigold are good at attracting hoverflies, bees and butterflies and the strong scent of the French Marigold types is said to deter nematodes. Like Calendula they will grow in almost any kind of soil, are easy to save seed from and often confuse pests if inter-planted with vegetables.

Chamomile and Daisy

Most composite flowers from the daisy family will attract a range of beneficial insects. The flowers may not appear to be stunning but hoverflies and predatory wasps love them. An added benefit of growing chamomile is that you can make delicious fresh herbal tea from the flowers.

Calla Lilies

Calla lily flowers, also called trumpet lilies or Lily of the Nile, most often have waxy-white flowers that gracefully twist and curl, ending in a delicate point. Calla lily flowers can also come in pink, orange or red, and the dark green, heart-shaped foliage can also be variegated with white spots. Calla lily plants are native to marshlands of South Africa but have gained popularity in gardens in the United States as marginal pond plants and container plants. It is a popular flower for weddings and Easter, and cut calla lily flowers last a long time in floral displays. The calla lily grows to 2 feet tall and can be grown in plant containers, and there are also miniature calla lily varieties that you can keep

Lavender

I’m sure you are familiar with the soothing properties of lavender’s scent. The flowers of this popular herb are used for a multitude of beauty products. Like all herb flowers, lavender blooms are edible. They have a distinctive floral taste with a hint of rosemary/mint combo. Use sparingly in sweet dishes; a little goes a long way.

Dahlias

Dahlia flowers do best in plant containers that are at least 1 by 1 foot, and low-growing and dwarf dahlia varieties are best for container gardening. There are so many dahlia flower varieties that every gardener can find something for their garden. These flowers come in every color imaginable for a flower except for blue. A blue dahlia flower has never been produced, even after the Caledonia Horticultural Society of Edinburgh offered a cash prize for the first person to grow a blue dahlia in 1846.

Morning Glories

The morning glory flower is a climbing vine with heart-shaped leaves blooms in the mornings. Morning glory blooms, which only last one day, come in a variety of colors (pink, purple, red and white, while blue is the most common) and usually bloom in mid-summer to late fall. Morning glory flowers can begin to bloom in March in warmer climates. These beautiful flowers grow well in plant containers on balcony gardens. Balcony gardeners can attach fishing line or durable string from the balcony railing to the roof and train the morning glory plant to grow along the string. This growth will provide dappled shade (you can intersperse white Christmas lights on these lines if there is an electricity outlet outside).

Cosmos

These tall, frilly annuals – which blossom in an array of colors – are one of the easiest flowers to grow from seed.

Cosmos look beautiful in borders or containers and they attract all manner of pollinators to the garden. What’s more, they make for stunning floral arrangements.

They prefer moist, well-drained soil that isn’t too rich, although they can grow in pretty poor soils too! Heat and drought tolerant, the cosmos can grow anywhere between 18 and 60 inches tall depending on the variety.

When growing from seed, it can take seven weeks until the flowers first appear, after which they will continue to bloom until the next frost.

Plantain

This common lawn weed (not to be confused with the tropical fruit also called plantain) is not only a great medicinal plant that can be used topically to soothe burns, stings, rashes, and wounds, but is also a great edible green for the table. The young leaves of plantain can be eaten raw, steamed, boiled, or sauteed, and while the older leaves can be a bit tough, they can also be cooked and eaten as well. The seeds of the plantain, which are produced on a distinctive flower spike, can be cooked like a grain or ground into a flour, and are related to the more well-known psyllium seeds, which are sold as a fiber supplement and natural laxative.

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